Help! I need to change the pod CIDR in my Kubernetes cluster

 

Your Docker EE Kubernetes cluster has been working great for months. The DevOps team is fully committed to deploying critical applications as Kubernetes workloads using their pipeline, and there are several production applications already deployed in your Kubernetes cluster.

But today the DevOps team tells you something is wrong; they can’t reach a group of internal corporate servers from Kubernetes pods. They can reach those same servers using basic Docker containers and Swarm services. You’re sure its just another firewall misconfiguration and you enlist the help of your network team to fix it. After several hours of troubleshooting, you realize that the problem is that you are using a CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) range for your cluster’s pod CIDR range that overlaps the CIDR range that the servers use.

Resistance is futile; management tells you that the server IP addresses can’t be changed, so you must change the CIDR range for your Kubernetes cluster. You do a little Internet surfing and quickly figure out that this is not considered an easy task. Worse yet, most of the advice is for Kubernetes clusters installed using tools like kubeadm or kops, while your cluster is installed under Docker EE UCP.

Relax! In this blog post, I’m going to walk you through changing the pod CIDR range in Kubernetes running under Docker EE. There will be some disruptions at the time that the existing Kubernetes pods are re-started to use IP addresses from the new CIDR range but they should be minimal if your applications use a replicated design.

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