docker

Who Can…?

Managing a Kubernetes cluster with one user is easy. Once you go beyond one user, you need to start using Role-Based Access Control (RBAC). I’ve delved into this topic several times in the past with posts on how to Create a Kubernetes User Sandbox in Docker Enterprise and Functional Kubernetes Namespaces in Docker Enterprise. But, once you get beyond a couple of users and/or teams and a few namespaces for them, it quickly becomes difficult to keep track of who can do what and where. And, as time goes on and more and more people have a hand in setting up your RBAC, it can get even more confusing. You can and should have your RBAC resource definitions in source control but it’s not easy to read and is hard to visualize. Enter the open source who-can kubectl plugin from the folks at Aqua Security. It gives you the ability to show who (subjects) can do what (verbs) to what (resources) and where (namespaces).

Auto Scaling Docker Nodes in AWS

ButterBall Turkey

I once heard a story from someone who worked at ConAgra. They produce and sell a variety of food products that you and I eat all the time. The most notorious is the ButterBall turkey. ConAgra owned Butterball from 1990 to 2006. Every Thanksgiving holiday, so I am told, ButterBall would have to scale up their call-center as well as their website to a couple hundred web servers to handle the demand for “how to cook my turkey?” That’s a lot of hardware!

We are only a couple months away from Thanksgiving. So, what do you call a turkey on the day after Thanksgiving? Lucky. #dadjoke

 

Interlock Service Clusters – with Code!

So a colleague of mine was helping his client configure Interlock and wanted to know more about how to configure Interlock Service Clusters.  So I referred him to my previous blog – Interlock Service Clusters.  While that article conceptually helps someone understand the capabilities of Interlock, it does not show any working code examples.

Let’s review what Docker Enterprise UCP Interlock provides. And then I will show you how to configure Interlock to support multiple ingresses each of which are tied to its own environment.

Attack of the Kubernetes Clones

One of the customers I support is using Kubernetes under Docker EE UCP (Enterprise Edition Universal Control Plane) and has been very impressed with its stability and ease of management. Recently, however, a worker node that had been very stable for months started evicting Kubernetes pods extremely frequently, reporting inadequate CPU resources. Our DevOps team was still experimenting with determining resource requirements for many of their containerized apps, so at first, we thought the problem was caused by resource contention between pods running on the node.

Kubernetes Network Isolation

In the 1980s there was a funny television commercial for an insurance company that was debauching many other insurance companies. These hideous competitors trained their agents to “Say NO, deny the Claim!” thereby denying customers the benefits of the insurance policy they had purchased. It always made me chuckle and I still remember the chant to this day. I want to show you how you can do this, “Say no, deny pod access!” in Kubernetes using NetworkPolicies applied to your application deployments.

Kubernetes Network Isolation
Denied

Recently while working with a customer who is quite new to Docker and the world of Kubernetes, they were inquiring about how to isolate their applications from each other in a shared Kubernetes cluster.

In a previous blog post entitled Kubernetes Workload Isolation I discussed how customers have segmented their cluster by using a combination of VLAN’s, Collections, and Namespaces. But if you are not utilizing VLAN’s to segment your networking among VM’s and if you are not using Collections to separate VM’s into different RBAC groups then you will need a different approach.

What is Container Orchestration?

Over the last two or three years I’ve given a similar presentation on containers to operations groups at clients, potential clients, conferences and meetups. Generally, they’re just getting started with containers and are wondering what orchestration is and how it impacts them. In this post, I will talk about what container orchestration is and provide several videos with simple examples of what it means.

Kubernetes Workload Isolation

There are many images of ships with pin-wheel colored containers in a myriad of stacked configurations. In the featured image above you can clearly see three ships at dock loaded with containers. These ships have unique destination port cities across the globe each one carrying a distinct set of product for a discreet set of customers. These containers carry a payload.

Our virtual docker containers carry a workload. So, the ships vary in what containers they carry, where they are transporting it, and for whom it belongs to. We will talk about how to get our virtual containers loaded into a particular ship and entertain one solution to VM and container isolation.


Over the years Capstone has work in many vertical industries. Several of Capstone’s customers have extremely regulated environments such as the banking, insurance, and financial investment industries. These industry verticals typically need to comply with numerous governing standards and often have unique ways of interpreting and applying those regulations to there IT infrastructure. All of these regulations are aimed at restricting, or at least minimizing, covert intrusion.

SSL Options with Kubernetes – Part 3

In the first two posts in this series, SSL Options with Kubernetes – Part 1 and SSL Options with Kubernetes – Part 2, we saw how to use the Kubernetes LoadBalancer service type to terminate SSL for your application deployed on a Kubernetes cluster in AWS and Azure, respectively. In this post, we will see how this can be done for a Kubernetes cluster anywhere using an Ingress resource.

Rather than using an external load balancer as the AWS and Azure cloud providers do for the LoadBalancer service type, an ingress uses an Ingress Controller to provide load balancing, SSL termination and other services within a Kubernetes cluster. A big advantage of using an ingress is its portability across all clusters regardless of the underlying infrastructure, i.e. cloud, virtualized or bare metal. Until recently, a disadvantage was an ingress only supported HTTP and HTTPS and you would need to use a NodePort service type for other protocols. However, NGINX has added support for other protocols to their ingress controller.

Building Images in a Heterogeneous Cluster

Recently I was troubleshooting a customer problem in their on-premise cluster. But I was not sure where the problem lay. So I switched over to using my colleagues Docker Enterprise demo cluster that is running in Azure. In this heterogeneous cluster are 1 Universal Control Plan (UCP) manager, 1 Docker Trusted Registry (DTR), 2 Windows workers, and 1 Linux worker.

Kubernetes NetworkPolicies in Docker Enterprise Edition

Kubernetes running under Docker UCP uses the Calico CNI plugin so that you can use Kubernetes NetworkPolicies to control pod to pod communication as well as communication between pods and other network endpoints.

This blog post will walk you through an example of configuring Kubernetes NetworkPolicies. We will block traffic from one namespace into another namespace, while still allowing external traffic to access the “restricted” namespace. As a high-level use case, we will consider the situation where a development team is working on multiple branches of a project, and the pods in the different branches should not be able to communicate with each other. If you are not familiar with the basic concepts of NetworkPolicies, see the Kubernetes documentation here.